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Posts tagged ‘Marta Merajver-Kurlat’

Main Character Blog Tour

I’d like to thank Marta Merajver-Kurlat, author of Just Toss the Ashes, for inviting me to participate in this blog tour. To read her post, click on http://www.martamerajver.com.ar/marta/index.php/blogroll

I’ve been asked to respond to the following questions about My Main Character in a Work in Progress.

1. What is the name of your character? Is he/she fictional or a historic person?

The main character, Roman Starke is the most influential man in the world as head of The Bank of the Milky Way, the target of a paranormal alliance. He is a work of my imagination, although his nickname is JC (comparable to the famous Roman conqueror), and some of his personality traits were conspicuous in a 21st century Republican presidential candidate.

2. When and where is the story set? space elevator image

This novel delves into the future described in my first novel, Pieces of You. The world of 2040 has changed drastically since that novel’s protagonist died. Control of the wealth is in the hands of a coalition of three international banking corporations, with the Bank of the Milky Way being the dominant force .
The story moves between Roman’s offices: Dallas; Moscow; George, South Africa; and Shanghai and into the outer reaches of the space elevators operated by the coalition.

3. What should we know about him/her?

He is a charismatic, brutal, greedy world leader and a widower with two daughters. Calligula

First Impression of Him: Rather handsome still; doesn’t look his age. After five minutes with him, it is clear how self-centered he is (all discussions revert to him/his experiences & perceptions).
Life-changing Events: Father’s death of a heart attack at 48 and wife’s death at 43 (hit by a car while riding her bike).
Accomplishments: Took over father’s investment firm and, with a partner, expanded it to become one of the world’s most profitable (he is now one of the world’s top ten richest).
Weaknesses: Tendency to retract statements and revise values based on ambition rather than morality; allows himself to be manipulated by a team of advisors, although he is unaware of their demonic origins.

4. What is the main conflict? What messes up his life?

The coalition Roman heads stores much of the basic foodstuff in outer space, transported there by a space elevator. The space elevator quits functioning after less than a year in operation when the cable is severed by a rocket veering off-course and cutting into the ribbon of carbon nanotubes. To reconnect the severed nanotubes quickly is very dangerous and no one with sufficient expertise has yet been found who is willing to take the risk. It is also very expensive and the banking coalition has not yet recovered the cost of the original placement. With the space elevator out of commission, the cost and speed of bringing food from its storage warehouse in space triples.
As the world famine becomes severe enough to produce rebellion, Roman’s daughter, Callie, tries–but fails–to influence the global leadership to expand the agricultural system they’ve created. Just as revolution seems imminent, Callie announces she will be the one to repair the space elevator. She won’t listen to her father’s objections and is helped by a team of his subordinates. In the minutes before ascension, the rebel leader, Camden, rushes up to Callie and gives her a passionate kiss. He is gone before Roman’s guards can capture him, but his kiss carries a virus and before her work is finished, she falls to her death.

5. What is the personal goal of the character?

His external ambition is to bring Callie into his company, not only because she is his favorite daughter, but also because she is the only person he trusts.
His internal ambition is too be revered globally, almost like a god. His dream is to be the number one global leader, and he is well on his way.

6. Is there a working title for this novel, and can we read more about it?

The title is Battle of Jericho, 2040. Here’s a short excerpt:

The tip of Roman Starke’s ears got flaming red when he listened to the message from the anchor station while he pulled on his mustache. Not the usual brushing over the hairs with the pads of two fingers; instead a hard jerking that could have thinned the mustache of a less robust man. But he uttered only one word—crap. Patrice, the only other person in their South African office, jerked to attention spilling the coffee she’d been savoring. The cup bearing the bank’s nickname, Candyland Bank, hit the thick carpet with a soft thud. Wiping up the puddle was not the most pressing concern . Hearing her boss use that tone of voice and with a word that was as close as he ever got to swearing meant bad news–seriously bad news. It had to be one of two issues: trouble from his younger daughter or a lifter malfunction.
“Is it Randi again?”
“Who?” Roman seemed in another world but recovered enough to speak his elder daughter’s name into his wireless mike. As Callie’s face appeared on the wall screen, it was clear where the problem originated.
“Dad, the cars were up there twenty–“
“I don’t care if they were up there two minute ago if they aren’t there now. I’ve put millions into this project, if you will, and I won’t have it fail! Callie, I need answers. Put Torin online, please.”
“But Dad, he’s busy—“
“I’m busier. A grain shipment is due from the space station tonight. I need to know I can count on its arrival.”
The screen showed her pretty mouth inverted, each end an arrow pointing to her trembling chin. She didn’t say anything else, just turned away from the monitor.
Roman wanted to call her to come back, but he only managed a weak Cal as Torin’s features solidified.
“Mr. Starke, we’re all upset. We’re doing our best to figure out what’s goin’ on up there.” Torin wanted to add, think of her crew, but he knew that would be a futile request.
“Will the shipment be here on time?”
“I can’t promise that until I know what we’re up against. You’ll know thirty seconds after we do.”
“That will be acceptable if it’s not more than two hours and thirty seconds from now. And pray that it’s good news.”
“Yessir.” After signing off, Torin had a desperate urge to hit something, but all the equipment was too expensive to pulverize. Instead, he changed into swim trunks, settling for a quick dunk in the Pacific Ocean. When he climbed back on board, shivering and expelling water like a wet puppy, Callie was waiting at the ladder with a towel, a light beer, and a poor excuse for a smile. Still, it was enough to keep him from sounding as hysterical as the man he reported to, the one who seemed to think he had the power of a god. Well, in many ways he did.

7. When can we expect the book to be published?

My goal is for it to be available on Amazon as an e-book and a “print on demand” paperback by All Souls’ Day (November 2).

My Writing Process: a stop on a blog hop tour

“The author Marta Merajver-Kurlat http://www.martamerajver.com.ar/marta/index.php/blogroll), author of Just Toss the Ashes and Living with Stress among others, invited me to participate in this blog hop tour and answer these four questions about my writing process.”

ALL ABOUT MY WRITING PROCEDURE Writers Museum


1)           
What am I working on?

 I am writing a sequel to my first novel, Pieces of You, which will be set exclusively in the future; whereas, Pieces’ protagonist, Mark, time-traveled from past experiences to the near future to the beyond. The title of my new novel, Battle of Jericho 2035, gives ample detail about the  plot. Using the example of how Joshua and his army won the battle of Jericho in a Biblical story, they did not knock the wars of the city down by force. They just marched around it (as commanded by God) and the walls fell flat on the seventh day, after  the 13th march.

In my Battle novel, the masses of people on Earth are controlled by a world council of super rich led by the leadership of one bank, nicknamed CandyLand. The people’s rations have been cut to the level of near starvation due to a malfunctioning space elevator. CandyLand’s director has ties to an unscrupulous group, while insurgents among the people are linked to Mark and his team of supernatural beings. There is sacrificial love as in the first novel, but the actors are not the same and the decisions could affect millions, not just Mark’s loved ones.


2)           
How does my work differ from others of its genre?

It’s easier forstanding on a book me to offer similarities. I’d like to think my current work has some things in common with C.S. Lewis’ space trilogy, especially the first book, Out of the Silent Planet.  As one of that book’s reviewers stated, “The most compelling points are the simple conclusions Lewis comes to about human nature and the corrupt world we live in.”

Science fiction is defined by readwritethink.org (a website that offers teaching resources) as “often about technology of the future detailing partially true theories of science. (If  it bends to the  unbelievable, it is labeled fantasy). The plot creates situations different from those of both the present day and the known past. Science fiction texts also include a human element, explaining what effect new discoveries, happenings and scientific developments will have on us in the future.” My story fits this criteria but injects social justice issues, typical of some but not all SciFi writers.

 

        3)            Why do I write what I do?

I’ve always loved science fiction best, maybe because it demands a creative flair, and maybe because it manifests possibilities within our impossible dreams.

I do believe it’s possible to write into being a different world, at least from the perspective that we can envision what it will look and act like. My hope is that my narratives will inspire readers to join with other dreamers and together become the architects of at least the foundations of this new world.

 Although I can’t explain why, I don’t believe I could ever write strictly to entertain. And although nonfiction—especially business and academic writing—has been my domain for most of my life,  those genres aren’t appropriate for my current writing goals. People read non-fiction to learn more of what interests them, not to have their beliefs and prejudices disturbed. While reading fiction, we absorb new information but in a more subtle and very effective way, by imagining ourselves there.


4)           
How does your writing process work?

 Not very effectively! Many of my colleagues have formulas that others applaud and often try to replicate. You won’t get that from me… I’m still working on “finding my voice,” on finding that place within myself where confidence, creativity, and competence merge.

 I don’t write regularly, in fact I seem to subconsciously (or deliberately) restrain the  urge to write. Some of that is my fear of failure—while acknowledging that not trying is a certain path to failure. The rest I chalk up to perfectionism. A former communications professor said something that has stayed with me all these years. It succinctly describes the problem with perfectionism: “you cannot be a participant and observer, too.” Too often I choose the observer role and then wonder why I can’t loosen control over my thinking to let in the light (of insight).

 I’m still searching for that precious place about which a Zen master told Natalie Goldberg, author of Writing Down the Bones: “If you go deep enough in writing, it will take you everyplace.” So instead of telling you how my writing process works, I will state unequivocally how I know my writing process should (maybe will?) work—actually it’s taken from Natalie—“..and though death is howling at our backs and life is roaring at our faces, we can just begin to write, simply begin to write what we have to say.”

*     

Joyce’s first novel, completed in August of 2012, was a response to a loss that made her ask some deep questions. Pieces of You, about a mystical journey that will make the protagonist capable of the sacrifice love asks of him, is available through amazon.com. Her author page: http://www.amazon.com/Joyce-Elferdink/e/B008ZTCRUY/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0  includes a book trailer. A sequel will be published later this year.*     

I am inviting Lori Foroozandeh to join our Blog Hop Tour next week. Information about her horrendous experiences in an Iranian POW camp as told in her book can be found here:

http://www.loris-song.com/ (WEBSITE)
http://lorissong.com/ (BLOG)
https://twitter.com/Loris_Song (TWITTER)
https://www.facebook.com/lforoozandeh#!/lforoozandeh (FB)
http://www.amazon.com/Lori-Foroozandeh/e/B002NSC2DU/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_pop_1 (AMAZON)

Great Novels are Handbooks for Personal Development

[A review of “Reading for Personal Development” by Marta Merajver-Kurlat]

The premise of this reflective little book is that reading provides much more than entertainment–books provide keys to some of the questions in our lives. A great book, one that stands the test of time, discusses issues “so profoundly human that we feel they inform the present.” Merajver-Kurlat also says, “Books have an ending, but are not truly finished until readers reinterpret and actualize them.”

I’ve chosen two of the ten books she interpreted in “Reading for Personal Development” to reinterpret for myself and to let other readers glimpse what Merajver-Kurlat’s researched analyses offer us.

I chose is Aldous Huxley’s “Brave New World” primarily because some of us find the future more fascinating than the past, maybe because we think we can have a part in improving the future while the past…is past. Huxley warns us of a future under a totalitarian regime. Merajver-Kurlat adds to this prophecy the potential to become a casualty rather than a liberator if we “renounce individuality for the sake of safety amid the flock.”

In my other choice, “The President” by Miguel Angel Asturias, Merajver-Kurlat asks us to bleed over this book to truly comprehend the nature of evil. For those of us who’ve never experienced life under a Latin American dictatorial government, the “unspeakable abominations” written about seem unreal. Yet those who’ve lived through these circumstances must be abler to place themselves in the roles of those who pretend nothing is wrong, or with those who must make themselves invisible to survive. Admitting to the horror would likely be a death warrant. Could it be that those of us who dare to read The President and similar books are the ones able to survive when we have the courage to demand an end to the horrors?

After finishing each chapter, I felt like I needed more of Merajver-Kurlat’s astute insights into each book’s meaning and application for my life–until I reviewed her purpose for writing: to teach me, the reader, to read between the lines.  Once I accepted her challenge to reach my own conclusions, I knew I‘d found the keys to answering my questions—instead of the author’s.

What books have been your handbooks for personal development?

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